All posts in Mammals

Cathryn Michon & W. Bruce Cameron, screenwriters of “A Dog’s Way Home”

Cathryn Michon & W. Bruce Cameron—screenwriters of the movie, “A Dog’s Way Home,” based on Cameron’s novel, and which had opened nationwide less than a week before this conversation—discuss the enthusiastic reception accorded the film: high audience ratings, third in box office sales on its opening weekend, after “Aquaman” and “The Upside,” some very favorable reviews, etc. Read more…

Dave Du Toit, founder of The Vervet Monkey Foundation

Dave Du Toit—founder and co-director of the Vervet Monkey Foundation, a 57-acre sanctuary in South Africa dedicated to the rescue and rehabilitation of not just Vervet Monkeys, but other primates who’ve been orphaned, injured, abused, were used in lab testing, or former pets—provides an overview of Vervets and what traits distinguish them. Read more…

Margaret Winslow, author of “Smart Ass: How a Donkey Challenged Me to Accept His True Nature and Rediscover My Own”

Margaret Winslow—professor emerita of earth sciences at the City College of New York and author, most recently, of “Smart Ass: How a Donkey Challenged Me to Accept His True Nature and Rediscover My Own”—recounts her experiences with animals growing up, where the family had dogs, cats were forbidden by her father, and she was one of those horse-crazy young girls. Read more…

Glen Zipper, creator-executive producer of the Netflix documentary series “Dogs”

Glen Zipper—the creator and executive producer of  “Dogs,” the Netflix six-part documentary series (and whose resume includes producing the Oscar-winning doc “Undefeated”)—recalls growing up in an animal-free household, pets having been declared verboten by his father. Read more…

Dr. Nick Pyenson, paleontologist and author of “Spying on Whales: The Past, Present, and Future of Earth’s Most Awesome Creatures”

Dr. Nick Pyenson—the curator of fossil marine mammals at the Smithsonian Institution’s National Museum of Natural History, and the author of “Spying on Whales: The Past, Present, and Future of Earth’s Most Awesome Creatures”—traces his interest in fossils to his childhood, when his parents would take him to natural history museums, experiences he called “formative.” Read more…