Jo-Anne McArthur, photographer, co-editor, and creator of “Hidden: Animals in the Anthropocene”

Owing to the coronavirus pandemic and the ongoing Stay at Home order, I produced and recorded this show remotely from home, the seventh program prepared this way at the Talking Animals corporate headquarters in Jupiter Farms, Florida, and likely the way the broadcasts will come together thru mid-June. Tentatively, we’re due back in studio on June 24.

Jo-Anne McArthur —an acclaimed photojournalist who served as creator, co-editor, and photographer for the forthcoming book, “Hidden: Animals in the Anthropocene”—responds to my beginning the interview in a different way (chiefly because McArthur has previously been a guest multiple times), starting with my questions about how she, as a photographer who’s specialized for years in documenting the often-awful plights of animals, staves of burnout or worse. She addresses counterparts photographically, as well as other measures that, for her, constitute self-care. McArthur explains that “Hidden” examines out relationship with the invisible, or hidden, animals in our lives—meaning, the animals we eat, we wear, we use in research and for entertainment, and those we sacrifice in the name of tradition and religion. She talks about the way the team of contributing photographers—30, scattered across the globe—generating what McArthur estimates will be about 250 images when the book is finished. She describes some images she feels are particularly representative of the “Hidden” mission, including one shot by Aitor Garamendia, resembling a family portrait, with four kids flanking…a giant circus bear. McArthur sets forth information about “Anthropocene,” and also notes there’s a crowdfunding campaign underway, through Dec. 7, primarily to cover the publication and distribution costs (https://www.indiegogo.com/projects/hidden-animals-in-the-anthropocene-by-we-animals#/  also the site for those who’d like to pre-order the book). She also enthuses over the news that Joaquin Phoenix had signed on to write the book’s foreword. [Photo of kids and bear: Aitor Garamendia. Of Jo-Anne: Josee Van Wissen] (https://weanimalsmedia.org, https://joannemcarthur.com,  https://www.facebook.com/joanne.mcarthur.35,  https://www.facebook.com/WeAnimals/ https://www.instagram.com/weanimals/)

ALSO: I aired an interview with Glen Hatchell, a former WMNF programmer (and occasional guest host of “Talking Animals”), who is the Behavior Manager at the Humane Society of Tampa Bay, where in 2012, he started conducting playgroups for the dogs awaiting adoption at the shelter. We discuss the playgroups, how they work, how they benefit the dogs. We also touch on the impact of COVID-19 on the shelter, and on the playgroups. (https://humanesocietytampa.org, https://mydogtrainer.com/about/https://www.facebook.com/glen.hatchell)

COMEDY CORNER:  Mike Birbiglia’s “I’m A Bear”  (https://www.birbigs.com)

MUSIC: Rebekah Pulley’s “Talking Animals Theme,” Bishop Briggs’ “Wild Horses,” instrumentals

NAME THAT ANIMAL TUNE:  Los Lobos’ “Will The Wolf Survive?”

 

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About the author
Duncan Strauss is the producer-host of “Talking Animals,” which he launched at KUCI in California in 2003, combining his passions for animals, radio, journalism, music and comedy. The show has aired since late 2005 on Tampa’s WMNF. Strauss lives in Jupiter Farms, FL with his family, including four cats, two horses and one dog. He spends each day talking to those animals, and maintains they talk right back to him, an as yet unverified claim.

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